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Torso Fragment by Casey Eskridge

Torso Fragment by Casey Eskridge

TITLE: Torso Fragment
ARTIST: Casey Eskridge
DATE: 2005
MATERIALS: Aluminum
DIMENSIONS: 3′ 2″ x 1′ 8″ x 1′ 6″
TYPE: sculpture


Torso Fragment (2005) is a contemporary take on the contrapposto form, an asymmetrical representation of the human figure that results when weight rests primarily on one leg.

Try it yourself. Put most of your weight on your right leg and notice how it shifts your shoulders and hips. Now, try it with your left leg. Artists often use contrapposto to capture dynamism and nuance in the human form.

While contrapposto can be found in art around the world, it became central to the European sculptural and pictorial repertoire during the Renaissance-perhaps most famously embodied in Michelango’s David (1504). This is the tradition from which Herron alum Casey Eskridge draws.

Eskridge’s figure evokes the fragments of ancient Greek and Roman sculpture that so inspired Renaissance artists. But, looking to the contemporary world, he casts his torso in aluminum—that material so essential to modernity—the fabric of airplanes, automobiles, skyscrapers, and computers

To learn more about this artwork, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Torso_Fragment,  which includes information created by Herron School of Art and Design and IUPUI Museum Studies faculty and students in 2009 as part of “A Survey of IUPUI Public Art.”

The Herron Arch 1 by James Wille Faust

The Herron Arch 1 by James Wille Faust

TITLE: The Herron Arch 1
ARTIST: James Wille Faust
DATE: 2005
MATERIALS: painted aluminum
DIMENSIONS: 20′ x 7′ x 7′
TYPE: sculpture

The Herron Arch 1 (2005) was the first large-scale sculpture created by James Wille Faust, renowned alumnus of the Herron School of Art and Design.

Composed of over thirty geometrically-shaped pieces of painted aluminum, the work sits at the intersection of sculpture and painting. “Unconcerned about what classification my work fits into, I am free to explore with no limitations and in any direction, style or medium,” states Faust, whose airbrush work has received acclaim.

A lovely conceit of this piece comes from moving around it. From its front or back, it appears black and white. But, as you move around it, you are greeted with a lovely array of prime colors—a reminder that things can surprise you if you give them time and approach them from different angles.

Designed and painted by Faust, the 20 foot tall arch was fabricated by Indianapolis-based Tarpening-Lafollette Company.

To learn more about this artwork, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Herron_Arch_1, which includes information created by Herron School of Art and Design and IUPUI Museum Studies faculty and students in 2009 as part of “A Survey of IUPUI Public Art.”

Job by Judith Shea

Job by Judith Shea

TITLE: Job
ARTIST: Judith Shea
DATE: 2005
MATERIALS: Bronze
DIMENSIONS: 6’3″ x 3’2″ x 2’6″
TYPE: sculpture

Judith Shea’s Job (2005) depicts the iconic figure alone, ragged, exposed to the elements, looking up to the sky. Who among us has not felt the same way? The power of sculpture to materialize—on a human scale—the stories, fables, beliefs, and traditions that give our lives order and meaning is one of the central promises of the medium. The wax coating of the bronze appear as rain drops, but it also calls to mind the tears Job appears to be too tired to shed.

Born in Philadelphia in 1948, Shea is an American artist who has worked with cloth and clothing forms, hollow cast metal clothing figure forms, and carved full figure statues in a variety of mediums.

To learn more about this artwork, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Job_(Shea),  which includes information created by Herron School of Art and Design and IUPUI Museum Studies faculty and students in 2009 as part of “A Survey of IUPUI Public Art.”