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Unitled (Indiana Limestone) by Adolfo Doddoli

Unitled (Indiana Limestone) by Adolfo Doddoli

TITLE: Unitled (Indiana Limestone)
ARTIST: Adolfo Doddoli
DATE: 1976
MATERIALS: Limestone
DIMENSIONS: Sculpture: approx. 2′ x 3′ x 1’4″; Base: approx. 2′ x 3′ x 1′
TYPE: sculpture


Indiana Limestone (1976) was carved from a single piece of limestone obtained from the Wooley Stone Company in Bloomington. What does it look like to you? A wave? A sand dune? Maybe a clam? Whatever comes to mind probably refers to the fluid, organic qualities of the piece—an impressive achievement when working with a medium as heavy and dense as stone.

Italian artist Adolfo Doddoli first came to the United States on scholarship at Colorado College. In 1969, he accepted a position at the Herron School of Art, where he taught and practiced for 30 years.

To learn more about this artwork, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiana_Limestone_(sculpture), which includes information created by Herron School of Art and Design and IUPUI Museum Studies faculty and students in 2009 as part of “A Survey of IUPUI Public Art.”

Table of Contents by Dale Enochs

Table of Contents by Dale Enochs

TITLE: Table of Contents
ARTIST: Dale Enochs
DATE: 2008
MATERIALS: limestone
DIMENSIONS: 42′ x 20′ x 50′
TYPE: sculpture


Table of Contents (1999) features an orb, a box, a pyramid, and a crescent cylinder carefully arranged on a hefty table, each fashioned from limestone. In some places there are fissures and lines; in other areas, it is smooth. The word “terrae” has been carved into the stone. “Terrae” refers to a vast highland region of a planet.

In choosing this word, Bloomington-based artist Dale Enochs may be asking us to think about connections between planetary and human scales, and how we mold one into the other. According to what values, laws, desires, and dreams do we fashion the world? Enochs’ provocative public work can be found throughout Indiana. He is based in Bloomington, where he earned his Masters of Fine Arts at Indiana University.

To learn more about this artwork, visit https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Table_of_Contents_(Enochs), which includes information created by Herron School of Art and Design and IUPUI Museum Studies faculty and students in 2009 as part of “A Survey of IUPUI Public Art.”